According to records, it was just one of several plantations Duncan owned. Furthermore, the fact that the island was difficult to defend during the wars of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries led colonists to turn their focus to this production, which required minimal financial input, while avoiding the destruction, each time the enemy landed, of the more costly sugar refineries. 6 thoughts on “ Life on an Indigo Plantation ” Cathy Richmond October 12, 2011 at 7:37 pm. Description: Map with a corner detail depicting slave labor on an indigo plantation. By opening a duct, the liquid was allowed to drain away progressively. In the seventeenth century and in the first half of the eighteenth century, this was a sector of choice for the production of indigo, a blue dye produced from the indigo plant. Slavery first came to Louisiana in 1706, when 20 Native Americans of the Chitimacha people were captured by the French in one of the frequent battles between the early colonists and the native peoples. The complex included everything from the main residence down to the pens for livestock.Southern plantations were generally self-sufficient settlements that relied on the forced labor of enslaved … Houses were built on both sides of the water using materials brought back and forth, but these plantations also grew items like cotton, indigo, and sugarcane to be sold elsewhere. Magnolia Plantation. Slavery existed under Spanish rule; however, African slavery became more prominent after the British took control of Florida. Indigo significantly impacted the world in the start of production of indigo in the America's by Eliza Lucas Pinckney, who started the trade of indigo through the slave trade route. She ran the plantation while continuing her father’s experiments in horticulture and being active in early Washington society. Africans in the Americas. It was also a trade-good used in the purchase of West African captives in the Atlantic slave trade. Shirley Plantation [Click on the image for a larger version.] Indigo significantly impacted the world in the start of production of indigo in the America's by Eliza Lucas Pinckney, who started the trade of indigo through the slave trade route. It was built in 1823 for Stephen Duncan, the wealthiest cotton planter in the antebellum south. 1862 photograph of the slave quarter at Smiths Plantation in Port Royal, South Carolina. The indigo crop failure turned out to be a blessing in disguise because Destrehan Plantation quickly became the leading sugar producer in St. Charles parish in the early 1800s. Enslaved women worked in the indigo fields growing and maintaining the crop. These same people produced the built environment: the main house for the plantation owner, the slave cabins, barns, and other structures of the complex. Indigo Plantations of the East Coast is part of the Slave Route—Traces of Memory network organized by the Conseil Général of Guadeloupe. Accompanying the correspondence are inventories, legal agreements, and an account book. Return to … ... On Hilton Head, Indigo … The liquid was then vigorously oxygenized by manual stirring to trigger the physico-chemical reaction which forms indigo particles. Eventually slavery became rooted in the South’s huge cotton and sugar plantations. Her parents began Riversdale Plantation in Maryland, then returned to Belgium. Indigo Point Plantation - Charleston Charleston County South Carolina SC: Indigo Point Plantation – Charleston – Charleston County. The first enslaved Africans in Louisiana were six people captured by the French army during the War of Spanish Succession in 1710. Transatlantic Slave Trade. It was then vigorously stirred manually to oxygenize it. Jim Cummings, the owner of Whitney Plantation, has spent millions on the museum’s artifacts and restoration to give visitors a true sense of life in the antebellum South. More than a third of enslaved children died before their first birthday, mostly due to malaria and malnutrition. The larger tank was known as the soaking tank, in which the harvested indigo plants were immersed, and has a slightly sloping bottom. Archaeological surveys that were carried out and a comparison of the indigo production at L'Anse à la Barque with that recorded on Grande-Terre and Marie-Galante would appear to show that it was built from the seventeenth century onward. Though most South Carolinians had few slaves, some landowners had many. Description: Map with a corner detail depicting slave labor on an indigo plantation. This indigo production unit comprises two solid-built tanks, corresponding to the two stages in the indigo production process. Unlike other plantations, Whitney Plantation doesn’t sugarcoat the lives of enslaved Africans who worked the former indigo and sugar farm. (Tristan YVON). Indigo is a beautiful substance that is inexorably linked to a long and painful chapter in the history of South Carolina. It was confusing to absorb so many slaves’ experiences from various plantations; people relate more easily to individual stories and a sense of place. Indigo Plantations of the East Coast is part of the Slave Route—Traces of Memory network organized by the Conseil Général of Guadeloupe. In the 17th and 18th centuries, black slaves worked mainly on the tobacco, rice and indigo plantations of the southern coast. Indigo was not grown on colonial plantations until an enterprising woman called Eliza Lucas Pinckney (1722–1793) developed the indigo plants as an additional cash crop for the Southern slave plantations. Once cut, the indigo plants, which were grown nearby, were placed in the first larger tank, known as the soaking tank, and filled with fresh water. I did, though, learn some interesting details. Nine out of ten enslaved people in Louisiana worked on rural farms and plantations. The tour is absolutely fascinating and an incredible insight into the history of Louisiana. This indigo production unit comprises two solid-built tanks, corresponding to the two stages in the indigo production process. This tank, which can no longer be seen, was examined when archaeological surveys were carried out in 2006, before being covered over again to preserve it. Resistance to Slavery. This material, dated 1779 to 1791, is an excellent source of information about the French colony in the decade leading up to the revolt by black slaves in 1791. The Caribbean. The crop could be grown on land not suited for rice and tended by slaves, so planters and farmers already committed to plantation agriculture did … In 1861, nearly all of Hilton Head Island was covered by plantations worked by slaves, according to maps from The Heritage Library and Beaufort County historians. They were built using a number of unique architectural styles. In 1861, nearly all of Hilton Head Island was covered by plantations worked by slaves, according to maps from The Heritage Library and Beaufort County historians. Only the liquid was kept; the indigo plants were discarded as soon as the fermentation process was complete. Indigo had been the East Florida "hobby horse" he had ridden to lucrative earnings, but his true "fortune makers" were the enslaved black men and women he employed at Guana River. There were two slaves per hectare on average on the indigo plantations. The value of the plantation came from its land and the slaves who toiled on it to produce crops for sale. This dye was important in the textile trade before the invention of synthetic dyes. The plain of Les Galets has the ideal geomorphological conditions for this production: relatively dry conditions which suit indigo plant growth and water in abundance in the limestone subsoil, essential for the production process. “In addition to economic motives, indigo production also succeeded because it fit within the existing agricultural economy. Expansion in the New World colonies enabled Europeans to develop production of a tropical plant, known as the indigo plant, from which a blue dye called indigo was produced. Lime, which was an essential ingredient in the mortar used to bind the solid-built structures, was obtained by burning coral. Labor on British Plantations in Florida During 20 years of British occupation, Florida plantations exported significant quantities of indigo, citrus, sugar and naval stores. The Saragossa Plantation is located just a few miles outside of Natchez. © 2021 The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation | About, Ruins of the windmill tower and sugar complex. The slave plantations were significant to the life and economics of the United States in the time before the outbreak of the … By embracing the consoling beauty of indigo and acknowledging the full breadth of its local history, we remember the enslaved people with blue-stained hands whose lives and labors contributed to the success of this community. It … On the slave plantation, slaves were used to harvest cash crops and complete other related agricultural work. This dye was important in the textile trade before the invention of synthetic dyes. In the 1850s, the property was sold to the Smith family, who occupied Saragossa until the 1980s. Indigo is a brilliant blue dye produced from a plant of the same name. The plantation economy of the 17th- and 18th-century American South was created by insatiable demand for cotton, indigo, rice and tobacco. The physico-chemical reaction which then occurred formed the indigo particles, which sank to the bottom of the tank. There were two slaves per hectare on average on the indigo plantations.