To what extent are you prone to Phariseeism? (p. Have you encountered this phenomenon? [p. 188-189], 5. [p. 150-153]. The main characters of this christian, religion story are , . 178-9. Introduction; Part 1: The Leap of Doubt; 1. 105 from The Reason for God Belief in an Age of Skepticism by Timothy Keller The New York Times bestseller that makes “a tight, accessible case for reasoned religious belief” (Washington Post).Timothy Keller, the founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Please note: This posting includes questions for the second half of the book, chapters 8-14, which covers Part 2: The Reasons for Faith. What barriers did they/you encounter? His question was coming from a sincere heart. Is it possible to have a God of love if we take away the doctrine of the cross? T. Wright does an extensive survey of the non-Jewish thought of the first-century Mediterranean world, both east and west, and reveals that the universal view of the people of that time was that a bodily resurrection was impossible.” How difficult was the process? Keller describes Christians as the “true revolutionaries.” Why does he use this term? 10. He listens not just to Christians but to non-Christians as well, and better than many … Answer: The Bible makes it abundantly clear that God created man and that He created him for His glory. How does Keller’s argument compare with Jesus’ teachings of good deeds in the Sermon on the Mount? 1. How would you defend your view? Intermission is a chance to think over what has transpired during the First Act. 6. Do you think Western Christian values are better than the values of other cultures? Chapter 9. The Reason for God small group Bible study can be used individually, with groups, or by any believer who is engaging with friends who don’t share his or her beliefs. Is there reason to believe in God? How is the concept of substitution “at the heart of the Christian message”? Write. Keller contrasts two people doing the same things for completely different reasons. What is the significance of this insight? We are freaks, the world is fine, and let us all go have lobotomies to restore us to a natural state. Does your life reflect that reality? We can leave… lobotomized, go back to the creek, and live on its banks as untroubled as any muskrat or reed. What do these arguments say about the relationship of science and religion, or more specifically, science and Christianity? There is no reason for human existence apart from serving the Creator, and in this we find our greatest contentment. Ransom Fellowship was founded by Denis and Margie Haack in 1981. [p. 187], 2. 6. What is the significance of this historical fact? In your own words, define forgiveness? How does it affect your interactions with non-Christians? Download a really helpful Reader's Guide with discussion questions. The problem is many people often question God with a rebellious untrusting heart not truly trying to get an answer from the Lord. David Richter, associate pastor of Trinity Presbyterian Church, and Dr. David Van Norstrand, medical student in the Mayo School of Medicine.). What is the difference between the gospel and an emotionally moving story of personal sacrifice? Summarize in your own words Keller’s description of how the Trinity informs our view of God as “love.” Imagine that your neighbor is a Buddhist, who remarks to you that she believes that true love is an illusion. Students Plead With Liberty U to Cut Ties With Falkirk Center, Sean Feucht is ‘Waging Biological Warfare’ Through Homeless Outreach Events, Activists Say, A Tale of Two Pastors: How John MacArthur and Rick Warren Led Through 2020. How do the particulars in these “‘how’ questions” differ from the essential issues laid out by the ecumenical creeds? The Reason for God challenges such ideology at its core and points to the true path and purpose of Christianity. Christians will be challenged to wrestle with their friends and neighbors' hardest questions, and to engage those questions in ways that will spark an honest, enriching, and humbling dialogue. 105 from The Reason for God Belief in an Age of Skepticism by Timothy Keller The New York Times bestseller that makes “a tight, accessible case for reasoned religious belief” (Washington Post).Timothy Keller, the founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Remember this—if you don’t live for Jesus you will live for something else.” Take stock of what good things in your life are threatening to become ultimate things. What plans should you make? He then moves to a discussion of creation? What steps might you take in your own life to combat such attitudes? The main characters of this christian, religion story are , . And he is right. [p. 159], 2. When you have asked secularists on what they base their belief in human rights, how have they responded? Keller proposes, “All doubts, however skeptical and cynical they may seem, are really a set of alternate beliefs.” To doubt one idea is to have faith in another. Reason for God is for anyone (the religious, the spiritual, the skeptic, the seeker, atheists, Christians and people of any faith tradition). Is there reason to believe in God? They try to attack the character of God because God allowed something to happen, which is a sin. The plagues were ten disasters sent upon Egypt by God to convince Pharaoh to free the Israelite slaves from the bondage and oppression they had endured in Egypt for 400 years. questions — and the corresponding defenses of God’s existence — that you will find in The Reason for God. The existence of moral values and obligations can be explained by sociobiology or evolutionary psychology [p. 147-148]. The Reason for God - Keller - Chapter 4. Hasn't science disproved God? [p. 157-158] Where have you demonstrated it yourself? We're sure that reading will lead you to join in better concept of life. 1) The very notion of an all-perfect being means God has to exist. Read Keller’s quote from Arthur Miller’s After the Fall. Keller offers Jesus Christ as the ultimate evidence for the existence of God [p. 123]. The author takes on each criticism and provides the relevant Christian response. (There but for the Grace of God… Daniel also serves on the advisory board of Justice Ventures International, a non-profit organization working to fight human trafficking and modern-day slavery around the world. This, in a nutshell, means that it is possible for each and every single person to venerate and communicate with God directly, without any intervention of the supposed “go-betweens”. How did you respond? “If the resurrection of Jesus happened,” Keller concludes, “that means that there’s infinite hope and reason to pour ourselves out for the needs of the world.” If this is true, why do some Christians argue that the needs of the world are of secondary importance to personal salvation? Why does he allow suffering? Use this discussion guide to The Reason for God: Belief in the Age of Skepticism, by pastor and author Timothy Keller, to guide your small group through some of the toughest questions people have about faith. How could a good god allow suffering: A good human would attempt to elevate unnecessary suffering of other humans. In other words, our purpose is to praise God, worship him, to proclaim his greatness, and to accomplish his will. The Knowledge of God [p. 181]. STUDY. Our values for the event are honesty, humility, respect and listening well to one another. Christians will be challenged to wrestle with their friends and neighbors’ hardest questions, and to engage those questions in ways that will spark an honest, enriching, and humbling dialogue. In what ways are you part of the “freaks and lunatics”? Free Discussion Guide . At a time when critics like Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens are questioning the very legitimacy of faith in God, Tim Keller presents intellectually rigorous reasons why believing in God makes sense. Use these guidelines when developing questions: Plan your questions. The Reason for God Timothy Keller Chapter 5: ... and the mental denials and distortions that accompany them. Its name is somewhat confusing. 3. 1. The discussion questions that follow are designed to be used in a group setting, with two or more people who are reading Keller’s book. 7. It is considered a work of "Christian apologetics," meaning that it targets skeptics, seeking to address their objections. According to the Bible, our purpose, the reason we are here, is for God’s glory. Although the father does not approve, he allows his son to make that choice. The first edition of the novel was published in 2007, and was written by Timothy J. Keller. [p. 189-190], 6. [p. 221], 4. 5. Keller ends the chapter with a description of what living the Christian life should look like. Discussing with other readers your own questions and your reactions to Keller’s [p. 210], 6. Keller says, “we must find the clues to his [God’s] reality that he has written into the universe, including into us” [p. 123]. What is his intention? He hears the questions people raise about Christian faith, has thought deeply about the answers, and has honed how he expresses those answers in countless conversations. How does this story restructure the purpose of work and life and culture? Free Discipleship Training Guide: What Is Discipleship Training? 3. On what do you think the concept of human dignity depends? Do you think that this is normally what non-Christians might expect from a “religious conversion?” Has this been true in your life? Many people believe that there is a reason for our existence and usually, though not always, it is based in religion. The questions that I raise in respect of God are fundamental to our understanding of a reason for being. Everyone has to answer these ‘how’ questions in order to live a Christian life” [p. 117]. Timothy Keller is the founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Manhattan, which he started in 1989 with his wife, Kathy, and three young sons. Responding to the questions of open skeptics and ardent believers, Keller draws from literature, philosophy, reason, and real-life conversations to explain how faith in […] Free download or read online The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism pdf (ePUB) book. The question is whether laymen like us can approach God directly. What implications does it have for your sense of calling in life and culture? Why does God allow evil? 2. Why or Why not? Keller says that the beauty of art/nature creates a longing that is a clue for the reality of God [p. 133-135]. How does Keller define Pharisee? Those individuals were asking questions. Terms in this set (11) T/F: The main question at hand in this chapter is "What is it about Christianity that makes its followers the exemplary and responsible citizens that they are?" What do you think of Dr. Keller’s claim that; “Rights cannot be created—they must be discovered, or they are of no value”? What has led to this generational and cultural misunderstanding and what has been the result? Precisely! Why is this observation important to his argument in this chapter? How is this different from being “relativistic and amoral”? As someone who knows that a Christian God exists, how much does this still encapsulate your day-to-day behavior? The Reason for God small group Bible study can be used individually, with groups, or by any believer who is engaging with friends who don’t share his or her beliefs. The Reason for God: Conversations on Faith and Life is a DVD for small groups hosted by Tim Keller of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Manhattan. Chapter 8. His book, The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism, is must-reading, whether you are a Christian or a non-Christian. He listens not just to Christians but to non-Christians as well, and better than many thinkers today, has his finger on the pulse of our world. How might serving God be different from what Keller calls shamanism. Together, they have created a ministry that includes lecturing, writing, teaching, feeding, and encouraging those who want to know more about what it means to be a Christian in the everyday life of the 21st century. Do your secularist friends agree? How does Keller respond to the argument that Jesus’ death on the cross is an example of “divine child abuse?” [p. 187, see also p. 192-193], 3. 11. The reason this understanding of the relationship between faith and reason is so important is that the great mass of ordinary people (and I count myself in this number) cannot come to an unshakable conviction about the truth of Christianity any other way. What are the two things Keller says are necessary to come to Christ? Why does Keller argue that trying to prove God’s existence is like looking directly at the sun? Keller discusses the Big Bang Theory as a clue for God. What sorts of action do you feel called to in your personal life and your professional or social life? Explain in your own words why Jesus had to die on the cross rather than God just forgiving us. “If a premise (‘There is no God’) leads to a conclusion you know isn’t true (‘Napalming babies is culturally relative’) then why not change the premise?” [p. 156]. Religion and the Gospel The Reason for God small group Bible study can be used individually, with groups, or by any believer who is engaging with friends who don’t share his or her beliefs. The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism (2008), American pastor and theologian Timothy J. Keller’s non-fiction Christian-themed book, seeks to highlight and address various criticisms of Christianity posed by skeptics in an effort to counter them. Instead, an examination of the history of Christmas exposes its roots in pagan religious rites. After outlining a series of arguments, Keller concludes, “That meant the tomb must have been empty… We can’t permit ourselves the luxury of thinking that the resurrection accounts were only fabricated years later” [p. 205]. [p. 165-169], 4. 14. However, what reason does the Bible give for God destroying the rest of animal creation, such as the creeping things, birds of the air, etc.? Without glancing at the Table of Contents, consider some of the “experiments” or “tests” in which you believe Christianity outperforms the other competing worldviews. Why or Why not? What is the significance of Dillard’s observation and reflection? And the Bible tells us that the God of love is also a God of judgment who will put all things in the world to rights in the end." What prayer can you offer or choices can you make to replace the religious that remains in your life with gospel? No one says everything you want to hear in the exact order, depth, and detail that you prefer. The discussion questions that follow are designed to be used in a group setting, with two or more people who are reading Keller’s book. [p. 188], 4. The Reason for God by Pastor Shane Russell How could a loving God send people to hell? What is Keller suggesting when he asks us to “put on Christianity like a pair of spectacles and look at the world with it”? Keller set out in this chapter to primarily discuss not the adequacy of secularist views of ethics and human rights, but the idea that all human beings actually know God exists [p. 142]. 3. Free Discussion Guide: The Reason for God by Timothy Keller, Report: World Vision Unwittingly Funded Org. How does Keller respond to the assertion that the cross is a tool to encourage the oppressed to simply accept violence and injustice? It is good for three reasons. In discussing a fuller understanding of the Gospel of Christ Keller says, “I do not think more of myself nor less of myself. [p. 202]. Keller says, “The purpose of Jesus’s coming is to put the whole world right, to renew and restore the creation, not to escape it.” What implications does this have for how you approach your work, your relationships, your approach to caring for the earth, and your place in society? 4. His new book addresses challenges to Christianity such as Jesus’ universal claims to be the only way to God, tensions between science and … false. [p. 180], 6. What steps can you take to be more sensitive to these temptations? Keller quotes Flannery O’Connor’s character Hazel Motes saying that “he knew that the best way to avoid Jesus was to avoid sin.” How can this still be a danger for those who have the right “by grace alone” theology? "The Reason for God, Belief in an Age of Skepticism," by Timothy Keller, is a pro-Christian work which lays out the major criticisms that modern skeptics have about faith and in particular Christianity. I have only read the first chapter so far. What questions might you have about this assertion? Keller says that though many conservatives complain that young adults are “relativistic and amoral,” he has not found that to be the case [p. 143-144]. 7. For the Christian—think back on your own conversation story and those of your friends and family. Why do you think so many people in our culture take issue with this view? Keller says, “This [idea of God creating the world to share it with us] leads to a uniquely positive view of the material world.” Is this conclusion surprising to you? Do you have friends who might be willing to do so? 1. The Reason for God challenges such ideology at its core and points to the true path and purpose of Christianity. The whole duty of man is to fear (reverence) God and obey his commandments (Ecclesiastes 12:13). In this context, read Matthew 6:1-18. Hasn't science disproved God? All our questions lead back to God because he is the one with whom we have to deal. The book was published in multiple languages including English, consists of 293 pages and is available in Hardcover format. [p. 212], Chapter 14. As much as the hiring manager wants to know more about the individual they hire, the individual wants to know about the hiring manager, future coworkers, and the organization.A finalist that neglects to prepare and ask questions during an interview misses opportunities to impress the hiring manager and to gather more information that will inform the decision to accept a job offer. How is this helpful in justifying belief in God? Keller quotes Luther in saying that the default mode of the heart is religion, even after conversion. Keller’s says, “If you don’t believe in God, not only are all these things profoundly inexplicable, but your view—that there is no God—would lead you not to expect them” [p. 140]. (It would probably require a series of conversations.) 3. “Does it sound stifling? Why or why not? If you have not owned up to your inconsistencies, what plans should you make? Flashcards. The Reason for God makes a tight, accessible case for reasoned religious belief." Question: "What was the meaning and purpose of the ten plagues of Egypt?" Use this discussion guide to The Reason for God: Belief in the Age of Skepticism, by pastor and author Timothy Keller, to guide your small group through some of the toughest questions people have about faith.. From The Reason for God site: Match. Most religious scriptures have a common answer that states that there stands no one in between the Almighty and His believers. As McClintock and Strong’s Cyclopedia states: “The observance of Christmas is not of divine appointment, nor is it of NT [New Testament] origin.”. The Reason for God – Chapter Twelve: The (True) Story Of The Cross “The primary symbol of Christianity has always been the cross,” begins Chapter Twelve. What would you say to them? Why does Keller say that we are defeated until we can forgive an offending person? Can one religion be “right” and the others “wrong”? The Reason for God small group Bible study can be used individually, with groups, or by any believer who is engaging with friends who don’t share his or her beliefs. Part Two: The Reasons for Faith March 30, 2011 He desired, and always has desired, a right relationship with people. How can Christians talk about Jesus as evidence to unchurched people in a meaningful way? [p. 180], 5. 2. First, it identifies and answers the questions being raised today. [p. 235], 6. Have you thought of Jesus in that way before, as evidence? It contains an opening thought and summary of the objection, scripture references, and extensive discussion questions. This is the archives of Ransom Fellowship (1981-2020). Keller describes approaching the reason for God as a scientist might approach a theory [p. 120-121]. Both sets of questions were formulated in weekly conversations I had on Keller’s book with two young friends: the Rev. Think back over the last seven chapters. The Clues of God What, according to Keller, are the consequences of a tit-for-tat view of retribution? Have they ever challenged you with your own contradictions? This is the reason that it is quite fair to call secularism a religion, and Christianity as well. Do you think this view fits well with the way the world works? What are the strengths in those theories? Download a really helpful Reader's Guide with discussion questions. [p. 206], 4. What is the difference between true forgiveness and “cheap grace”? 7. So, it's important for you to start having that hobby. How do you see this in the world around you? Do you think Dr. Keller’s intention is for us to use his statements in this chapter as weapons to win arguments with our non-Christian friends? [p. 194-195], 9. Keller says that this understanding of the Gospel “gives us a new basis for harmonious and just social arrangements.’ Who is he talking to here? What difference in perspective do you notice? How might we better cultivate relationships among our fellow Christians so as to alleviate this fear? How might this term be misunderstood by Christians? Tim Keller's The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism (TRG, hereafter) is the result of the many questions about God and Christianity pastor Keller has received over the years during his time at Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Manhattan, New York. The second part is The Reasons for Faith. Our main purpose for being on earth is to be stewards of God's creation, to grow in God, and to function as God's sons and daughters. If you are a Christian, be honest—do you at times agree with this sentiment? 8. What about injustice? The question is whether laymen like us can approach God directly. Examine your own life. Keller ends the book with a story that illustrates a startling reality about salvation. What does this longing signify and how could you articulate this idea of “unfulfillable” desires to someone who lacks a “Christian vocabulary”? The first edition of the novel was published in 2007, and was written by Timothy J. Keller. Keller warns us right from the beginning that this chapter is not for beginners. I think these are great resources for those seriously seeking answers to tough questions about God. Gravity. Answer: The principle of sufficient reason is closely related to cosmological arguments for the existence of God. Often these “clues” for God’s existence are put forward as “proofs.” What reasons might believers have for presenting them as “proofs”? “Despite the claims of many to be such, there are no truly ‘generic’ nondenominational Christians. "The source of the idea that God is love is the Bible itself. “It is dishonest to live as if he is there,” Keller says referring to God, “and yet fail to acknowledge the one who has given you all these gifts” [p. 158]. [p. 227-228], 2. Spell. The questions are designed to get the group discussing the substance of Keller’s book, and may cover more detail than any particular group will be interested in covering. [p. 223], 5. Contents. This is what glorifies him. The people at that time were so evil, so in rebellion against God and His decrees, that God was lamented, then decided to take radical action. If not, then as Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban says: “What authority do we as Westerners have to impose our own concept of universal rights on the rest of humanity?” [p. 149]. 135-139]. What answers are commonly given? How does it offer evidence for God? All smaller issues lead us back to the one who sits on the throne of the universe. If you do not believe in it, how might you suppose your life would change if you became convinced it really happened? Tim Keller, who is pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian in Manhattan, listens carefully. [p. 206-208], 5. You know, reading is not the force. “Does that scare you?” he says. -The Boston Globe Keller says of Jesus’ resurrection, “If it happened, it changes our lives completely.” Do you agree? Particulars and dates aside (both of which will always be disputed), recast this “clue” in your own words. [p. 197], 11. Keller says, “Many Christians claim that their arguments for faith are so strong that all who reject them are simply closing their minds to the truth out of fear or stubbornness” [p. 118]. In this section he tackles 7 key questions/issues that non-Christians have with the claims of Christianity. [p. 177], 2. Questions for the first half of the book are posted on our website under The Reason for God: Questions for Discussion (I).