Muscle cramps are often quite painful are usually felt in the back of the leg and in the front of the thigh. Treatment may also include anti-inflammatory medications and pain relievers to reduce pain and swelling. However, sometimes there is something more to blame—that’s when you should see a physician or your physical therapist! The most common dance injuries that I have seen and had excellent results with are as a result of overuse and over training. It might be due to an overly rigorous practice schedule, an accidental fall, a nutritional deficit, or some other reason. Shin splints is the name given to the condition involving pain at the front of the lower leg. The pain typically comes from hip flexor tendonitis or iliotibial band syndrome (ITB). The most common muscle strains involve the lower back, neck, shoulder, and hamstring. Anti-inflammatory medications can help with inflammation and swelling. Ill-fitting shoes can cause foot and toes injuries. Most dancers will experience their first sprain by age 13. Common Dance Injuries Overuse injuries play a big part in dance related injuries. Foot and Ankle Injuries Injuries of the foot and ankle are most common that we see ballet dancers. Common Dance Related Injuries Dancers are exposed to a wide range of risk factors for injury. Artists and athletes. “Trigger Toe” (Flexor Hallucis Longus Tenosynovitis). Additionally, dancers can also sustain impact injuries – such as bruises caused by falling, collisions or trips and slips. Ballet is an incredibly demanding physical artform which rivals Olympic sports like gymnastics and skating for the extremes of strength, control and flexibility required to perform ballet to a high level. The following is a list of common dance injuries, their causes, and tips for treatment and prevention. 3. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome, also known as “jumper’s knee,” results from the kneecap “tracking” incorrectly due to muscle imbalances like tight hamstrings and calves coupled with weak quads. Complete rest from activity is usually recommended, and often required, as some dancers find it difficult to simply walk with shin splints. If you do suspect an injury, stop dancing immediately and allow your body to heal before dancing again.​​. Pain: gradual onset of pain along inside of ankle and under the foot while pointing the big toe which may also feel like big toe is “stuck”, Prevention: good form with your relevés and not crunching your toes to force a pointe, rolling out the arch of your foot with a ball (but not to the point of pain), Treatment: physical therapy (correct technique, modalities to decrease inflammation, stretching, massage), surgery to release tendon from surrounding tissues if symptoms do not resolve, Prevention: stretching your Achilles and stretching (but not forcing) your pointe, Anterior (front) Pain: pain at the front of the ankle with plie and landing, Treatment: PT to improve mechanics and technique (manual therapy), Posterior (back) Pain: pain at the back of the ankle with tendu or relevé, Treatment: PT to improve ankle mechanics and technique (manual therapy), surgery if there is a bone spur or “extra bone” between heel and back of tibia, Pain: snapping/clicking sound in front of the hip with developpé and battements, Prevention: foam rolling your hip flexors, quadriceps, IT band, and glutes as well as strengthening your glutes, Treatment: PT with core strengthening, pelvic stabilization, modification of class and rehearsal work until symptoms resolve, Pain: passé, developpé a la seconde, pain with flexion and internal rotation (turning in), Treatment: PT with stretching, hip/core strengthening, pelvic stabilization, dance modification and rehearsals; may result in surgical intervention as needed, Pain: pain in the front of the knee with jumping, plie, or stair negotiation, Prevention: core and hip strengthening; foam rolling hip flexors, quadriceps, IT band, and glutes, Treatment: physical therapy with focus on core and hip strengthening, IT band stretching, and re-education of dysfunctional movement patterns. These occur when your child uses her joints and muscles repeatedly during training and performance. Below are a few of the most common dance injuries that dancers typically suffer from. Also, never dance on concrete or other hard surfaces. The foot/ankle/lower leg area is vulnerable to a wide range of injuries, including stress fractures, tendon injuries, sprains, and strains. Muscle strains are caused by sudden contraction of a muscle and poor flexibility. Here's how you can prevent the most common dance injuries. The most common dance injuries are soft tissue or overuse injuries that arise. Pain is usually felt at the front inside of the shin bone. Some common dance injuries: A few studies that looked into dance injuries found that injuries from using your joints and muscles too much (overuse injuries) are the most common in dancers. Dance Injuries: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention Webcast, Rajwinder Deu, MD; Amanda Green, DPT, COMT; Andrea Lasner, MSPT, PMA-CPT, http://webcast.jhu.edu/Mediasite/Play/e8683d13bc3d4ca6991387a16674df701d. Particularly spending an extended time on pointe or performing a large number of relieves (or any repetitive movement) in a short period of time. you should check in with your physical therapist or physician, Pain: acute onset with pain on the inside or outside of the ankle, swelling and bruising may be present in more severe cases, Prevention: 4-way ankle exercises, hip strengthening, Treatment: RICE, joint protection, early mobility, physical therapy. It’s important for parents to recognize the symptoms and prevent further damage. (Liederbach, 1985) Flexor Hallucis Longus (FHL) tendinopathy is seen in classical ballet, particularly those who go en … The purpose of this study is to define the incidence, risk factors, and management of musculoskeletal injuries in professional modern dancers. Treatment: Treating a muscle cramp usually involves stretching the affected area. These are followed by injuries to the spine, hip, and knee, in that order. It is extremely common in dancers due to the imbalance between the amount of external rotation (turn out) they have compared to the amount of internal rotation (turn in). As the Achilles is active during relevé and pointing the foot, this overuse injury is quite common in dancers, especially those utilizing improper technique or participating in excessive training. Common injuries in ballet dancers. The high demand that the sport places on the feet and ankles can cause acutely traumatic injuries or issues that are due to repetitive stress. Most wouldn’t consider the floor type and temperature in the studios but these factors play a huge role in injuries. Stretching before dancing, along with an appropriate warm-up and cool down, can prevent muscle cramps caused by physical activity. Acute injuries do occur in dance, but overuse injuries are the most common because of the repetitive nature of training and performance. Treatment: The best way to treat a stress fracture is to rest and take a break from high-impact dancing to help the fractured bone heal. The placement of repetitive forces on the patella, like through performing jumps or plies without proper form puts a dancer at increased risk. ANKLE SPRAINS. These injuries can either occur acutely (such as following or fall) or chronically (they develop gradually, over time). Prevention: To prevent plantar fasciitis, be sure your dance shoes fit correctly and replace them as needed. Do not try to push yourself too hard in order to perform difficult steps. Always remember to bend your knees when landing jumps. It is very important to stretch always stretch and warm up before every dance session. Your feet need proper support in order to protect your muscles from injury. Good hydration before, during, and after dancing is also important. The foot and ankle are the most common area to be injured in dancers. Prevention: To prevent muscle cramps, make sure to stretch before and after dancing. Ankle/foot injuries are in the sixth place. Almost half of all injuries in professional ballet companies can be foot and ankle. In dance, artistic statements are presented through great displays of athletic skill. Amateurs have injuries most commonly in the spine, knee, shoulder, skin and ankle in this declining order. By Bari Lieberman. Though there are many types of injuries, some are more common among dancers than … This article includes the injuries, how they are caused, and how to treat them. Ankle impingement is the pinching of tissues at ankle (tibia and talus) at either the front or the back of the ankle. Dance Specialist Dr Lisa Schoene speaks with Russian Pointe about the most common injuries she sees with dancers. Plantar fasciitis is particularly common in ballet dancers who dance in pointe shoes. Treatment: To reduce pain and swelling, try putting applying ice to your heel. Plantar fasciitis is a strain or irritation on the ligament that connects your heel bone to your toes. Broadway and touring performing artists dance an average of eight shows a week. If you do experience an injury, it’s better to address it sooner rather than later, so that you can take care of it and get back on stage. Their exertion level rivals, if not exceeds, that of professional athletes! For initial treatment, apply ice for a few minutes every hour, reducing the frequency of icing to 3 or 4 times per day. The most common injuries in professional breakers are in the knee, spine, skin, wrist and ankle. The risk of injury is always present with any physical activity, and ballet is no exception. PT is extremely important because the ligaments will never heal back to the pre-injury level. There is evidence that musculoskeletal injuries are an important health issue for dancers at all skill levels. In severe cases, surgery may be required to repair the damage. Dance requires incredible strength, stamina, and flexibility. The injury usually causes tenderness of the muscle and possibly swelling. © 2021 NeuroSports: A NeuroTour company. The majority of these overuse injuries involve an ankle, leg, foot or lower back. Treatment: Treating shin splints involves first reducing pain and inflammation, then restoring the muscles to their original condition. Sunday, January 14th, 2018 Elizabeth Anthony. The goal is to work intimately with the dancer to care for the injury and, if possible, continue … Spine injuries in dancers Curr Sports Med Rep. Jan-Feb 2011;10(1):40-4. doi: 10.1249/JSR.0b013e318205e08b. Still, acute injuries such as ankle sprains are also common. Here are some common dance injuries, including the pain associated, how to prevent and how to treat them if it occurs: 1. FHL Tenosynovitis of the Foot/Ankle. How to Prevent and Heal Blisters on Your Feet, Things Skaters Should Know About Head Injuries. Prevention: In order to prevent a stress fracture, set realistic dance goals with reachable time frames. Treatment: Minor muscle strains can be treated with the RICE method: rest, ice, compression, and elevation. Female ballet dancers seem to be at high risk for developing stress fractures in the lower legs and feet. The most common issues that cause dance injuries are the type of dance and frequency of the class, duration of the training and the conditions of the environment. Common dance injuries: spasm, muscle or ligament tear (or strain), tendonitis, sprain, dislocation, fracture, overload (chronicle fatigue) syndromes, vascular syndromes. Anti-inflammatory medications can also be used to reduce inflammation. The sooner you address injuries, the less severe the complications may be and therefore, the less time (if any) you’ll have to spend away from dance! Dancers should also never wear old or worn out ballet shoes or pointe shoes. Other common dance injuries There are a few more injuries that are quite common in dancers including Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, shin splints, posterior ankle impingement (commonly known as ‘dancers heel’), bunions and even ingrown toenails. Why Do Some Skater's Feet or Ankles Hurt? These injuries show up with greater frequency in dancers as they age, … Give your body plenty of time to develop the muscles you need in order to master difficult steps, Also, maintaining a healthy diet is important. The most affected area of a sprain are the ankles and knees. Ankle Sprains . Modern (or contemporary) dance has become increasingly popular, yet little has been reported with respect to modern dance injuries and their consequences. Therefore, it’s not uncommon for dancers to experience pain. Ankle sprains are the most common traumatic (or acute) injury in dancers. However, when it does happen, it can be immensely frustrating and poorly timed. Dance Injuries: 5 Common Injuries and How to Prevent Them. Explanation and treatment. The physician must familiarize himself or herself with dance terminology, common moves, correct technique, and dancer's mentality. Achilles tendonitis is an inflammation of the tendon in the back of the ankle that connects the prime mover for pointing to your foot. The dance community is paying more attention, with companies like New York City Ballet and Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre providing cross-training, pre-season screenings, and educational seminars to reduce injuries. When should you be concerned that the pain you are experiencing is something that you should get checked out by a healthcare professional? Knee Injuries: Knee injuries are common in dancing. Here, we discuss the most common dance injuries and how they can be treated. She writes about dance styles and practices and the history of dance. Their exertion level rivals, if not exceeds, that of professional athletes! Sprains could lead to an increased risk of arthritis of the joints. Most are repetitive stress injuries (RSIs), and respond to rela- tive rest and gentle, maintenance stretching. Therefore, it’s not uncommon for dancers to experience pain. What are common dance injuries? It is crucial for dancers to prepare their bodies for the rigors of dance in an effort to prevent dance injuries and promote longevity in the sport! The injury usually causes tenderness of the muscle and possibly swelling. Overuse injuries can occur in the bone, which leads to stress fractures, or in the tendon, which leads to tendinitis. Stress fractures are usually caused by overuse or repeated trauma to a bone. Here are some common dance injuries, including the pain associated, how to prevent and how to treat them if it occurs: Ankle sprains are the most common traumatic (or acute) injury in dancers. Hip impingement can be caused by many different factors from arthritis, labral tear, stress fracture, muscle strain, snapping hip syndrome, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, to piriformis syndrome. High-level dancing involves a number of difficult manoeuvres involving jumps, landings, twists, and lifts with partners. Muscle cramps that occur at night during rest may be prevented by an adequate stretching program. Applying heat with a heating pad may also help. Broadway and touring performing artists dance an average of eight shows a week. Add to that, the countless hours in rehearsals. Across the whole spectrum of dance there is little doubt that the vast majority of injuries are the result of overuse rather than trauma. Injury type and occurrence will vary dependent on the genre of dance; however, most studies show that the foot and ankle are the most common injury site for dancers. A muscle cramp is an involuntarily contracted muscle that does not relax by itself. Gently massaging the muscle will also help it to relax. It’s important to treat early as to prevent tendon rupture! Common dance injuries. Most dancers train between 6 to 35 hours per week. Some people may not think that dancers are athletes, but dancers know better. Mar 8, 2013 Shaking your booty on the dance floor can be way more than a good time—a dance … Dr Victor Seah, orthopaedic surgeon at Parkway East Hospital talks about what they are and how they are treated. If you experience pain at night, pain at the start of your activity, pain that increases with activity or pain that causes compensations and changes in mechanics while dancing (or in day-to-day life), you should check in with your physical therapist or physician. The most common injury that we treat is hip pain. One of the most important ways to prevent dance injuries is to take the time to properly warm up the major muscles of the body. Add to that, the countless hours in rehearsals. Explanation and treatment. Sometimes a cramp can recur multiple times until it finally relaxes. All dancers should be especially cautious to land properly after attempting a jump to avoid shin splints. Foot and Ankle : (Ankle Sprain Achilles and Tendonitis or Injury) "It's not broken" gives little solace to the dancer who suffers "only a sprain" because the pain keeps her grounded until it heals. This injury occurs due to several factors such as arthritis, snapping hip syndrome, muscle strain, fracture, and labral tear, among others. Make sure you incorporate calcium- and Vitamin D-rich foods in your meals. Dance. This injury is caused by any movement that forces the ankle outside of the normal range of motion, resulting in an overstretching …