-- How do flying foxes help plants? Tragically, populations of flying foxes across Queensland, NSW and Victoria are in decline. Except that these aren't really wings-they're more like hands. Decreasing animal entanglement & death by up to 90 per cent, Decreased risk to domestic animals and members of the public from entangled animals, Reduced cost to householders in replacing netting from which animals have been cut, Decrease in long term costs: wildlife-safe netting is typically stronger and long lasting, Substantially decreased workload and risks for volunteer wildlife workers, Significant cost reduction for wildlife shelters, Decreased trauma to members of the public and wildlife workers, who currently witness the animal cruelty caused by these nets, A level playing field for netting retailers. In January 2011 alone, NSW rescuers undertook 411 bat entanglement rescues. These flying foxes live in tropical forests and swamps and are most likely to be found near water bodies, where they roost among banyan, tamarind, and fig trees. It is also the most vulnerable species because it competes with humans for prime coastal habitat along the south-east Queensland, NSW and Victorian coasts. } Read on to find out why the wrong kind of netting can also be deadly to these important animals, and discover the simple solution to this problem. Flying foxes, like bees, help drive biodiversity, and faced with the threat of climate change, land clearing, and other human-caused ecological pressures, we need them more than ever. Gray foxes live much longer in the wild than other foxes, usually up to about 12-16 years and can live up to 20 years in captivity with the right care and environment. Using safe netting around fruit trees is a simple and very effective alternative to shooting, and helps to protect fruit and our precious flying foxes. NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment, Rescuing and rehabilitating injured flying-foxes, Monitoring flying-fox camps and populations. Slideshow. }else{ The same animal may return to the same camp each year, but they may not. Lily D'Ambrosio MP Sydney Bats: Ku-ring-gai Bat Conservation Society, they tend to be greater than one hectare in size. Issues with flying-foxes in urban areas can also be addressed by managing the flying-fox camps and effective communication. There are four mainland species of flying fox: Black, Grey headed, Spectacled and Little Red. They live in the tropics and subtropics of Asia (including the Indian subcontinent), Australia, East Africa, and some oceanic islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Four species of Flying-fox live in Australia: the Grey-headed Flying-fox, the Little Red Flying-fox, the Black Flying-fox and the Spectacled Flying-fox. document.write(''+e2+''); Tragically, shooting flying foxes is not only ineffective, but raises severe cruelty issues. Flying foxes make the mos… remove the fruit from the tree, or use wildlife-friendly netting) and the flying-foxes will look for food somewhere else. Hotels near Flying Foxes, Cairns on Tripadvisor: Find 29,413 traveller reviews, 46,415 candid photos, and prices for 108 hotels near Flying Foxes in Cairns, Australia. Thank you to our member society, Victorian Advocates For Animals, for their assistance in compiling this information. Visit Flying-fox camp management for more information. Level 13, 400 George Street As human land uses impact natural habitat for flying foxes, the gaps between forested areas become wider. It’s not clear why flying-foxes choose the sites they do. ACN 617 08 0387. Flying-foxes are not faithful to camps. Health and handling. The first baby flying-foxes for the 2016 birthing season have now been spotted. Many animals who are shot are only wounded, and slowly die over days from infection and dehydration. ')+1); The Indian Flying Fox ( Pteropus giganteus) is endemic to South Central Asia. // -->, The Hon. (07) 4091 5861